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Twisting and Turning: Tips on Rimming Glasses and Muddling Ingredients

Certain ingredients in cocktails always seem to add that perfect touch. Mint gives the Mojito its invigorating flavor, while a Margarita feels incomplete if it's not served in a salted glass. Our pros will show you two essential techniques for preparing these perfect touches-muddling and rimming.

What is muddling?

Mojitos have become all the rage among cocktail lovers, but muddling, or mashing ingredients, isn't just for mint leaves. Bartenders also muddle to extract juice and oils from fresh fruit, particularly citrus. If you're muddling an orange or a lime, use modest amounts of pressure on the fruit. Too much pressure will bring out the sour flavor in the rind. If you're muddling mint, remember to mix in some simple syrup before you begin.

Here's how to muddle:
Place fruit or mint into the mixing glass. Gently turn the muddler 4-5 times, putting a minimal amount of pressure on the ingredient(s) you're muddling. View below for tips from our muddle master.

Tip:

Mint's not the only herb you can muddle. Try making a Bulleit Cucumber or a Sage & Pineapple. 

What is rimming?

Add just the right accent to your cocktail by rimming, or flavoring the edge or your glass. Dusted chocolate and cinnamon sit well on the brim for sweet cocktails, like Chocolate Martinis. A glass with a salted rim is essential for Margaritas, while a sugared rim is a must-have for Sidecars. No matter what the drink, you should only rim half the glass. This gives the drinker the option of enjoying the cocktail without the rimming.

Rimming a glass is easy:
Spread out a few tablespoons of the rimmer on a small plate. Gently rub the rim of the glass with a lemon or lime (for salt), or orange (if the rimmer is sweet). Roll the rim of the glass across the plate until half the rim is covered. See what our pro bartenders say about rimming.

TIP:

Place garnishes on the side of the glass that's not rimmed.